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Figure Skating

Evan Lysacek – Men's U.S. Champion Skated to Gold

Evan Lysacek: 167.37  – 257.67
Winner Gold Medal – from the United States

Evan Lysacek wins the Men’s freestyle skate tonight in Vancouver. It was a long night of competition. He did not pull a quad, but had a perfect skate technically. The scores are as follows:


Evgeni Plushenko: 165.91 – 256.36
Winner Silver Medal from Russia

He came in big from the men’s short program, poised for the win, but after all the chatter about the quad and the rivalry, it seems that nerves got the best of Evgeni tonight, he skated well, popped a quad but in the end he could not pull out the win.


Daisuke Takahashi: 156.98 – 247.23
Winner Bronze Medal from Japan


Stefane Lambiel 162.09 – 246.72
4th Place from Switzerland

Patrick Chan of Canada: 160.30 – 241.42
5th Place from Canada

Young Patrck Chan had a good skate, but he faltered. At 19 his skating career is far from over. The judges were very generous with scoring tonight affording every point to Chan that he needed. But in the end, he stood in 5th position.

and
Johnny Weir:  156.77 – 238.87
6th Place from the United States

Johnny Weir wasn’t going down without a fight, there was no quad, but there was spunk. After all the drama about costumes and fur, Johnny came and did what he could do, but it wasn’t enough to challenge the pack. Maybe next time Johnny.

Honorable mention goes to Nobunari Oda – ( 238.54 ) who skated a wonderful program to Charlie Chaplin, only to have a skate lace pop out with a minute to go in his program, and he was penalized 3 points for a wardrobe malfunction. And he got back out there and finished his skate. Had his skate not popped he would have contended for a medal.

From CTV Olympics: The Final Call:

Patrick Chan‘s free skate lifted him two places from Tuesday’s disappointing seventh-place finish in the short program, but it wasn’t enough for a podium finish.

Chan finished fifth in the men’s figure skating competition. The 19-year-old skater from Toronto finished more than 16 points behind the new Olympic champion Evan Lysacek of the United States.

Lysacek dethroned 2006 Olympic gold medallist Evgeni Plushenko, edging the Russian by just over a single point after he performed a clean skate to Sheherazade by Nikolai Rimski-Korsakov. The 24-year-old American’s winning combined score was 257.67 points.

Skating last in the competition after winning Tuesday’s short program, Plushenko skated a clean program but scored 1.86 points less than Lysacek for his technical elements.

It was less than two points, but it was enough.

Plushenko took silver with a combined score of 256.36.

Japan’s Daisuke Takahashi fell on his opening quadruple toeloop to earn bronze with 247.23.

Chan, seventh after Tuesday’s short program, stepped out of an early triple Lutz and fell outright on a triple Axel late in his program, Thursday.

It was his footwork that picked him up off the ice.

The reiging world silver medallist’s level-4 step sequence was performed flawlessly, and Chan picked up a whopping 82.00 points in the category that takes skating skills, transitions and link footwork, performance and execution, choreography and musical interpretation all into account.

Chan is famous for his difficult and intricate footwork, and he used it to finish fifth behind four points behind Swiss skater Stephane Lambiel with a score of 241.42.

Johnny Weir of the United States finished sixth with a score of 238.54 while Japan’s Nobunari Oda – fourth after the short program on Tuesday – received a three-point deduction after snapped skate lace halted his skate. Oda was awarded three minutes to fix the problem, then resumed his program where he had left off.

But the deduction proved costly, and Oda’s combined short program and free skate score of 238.54 dropped him to seventh.


Evan Lysacek – Men’s U.S. Champion Skated to Gold

Evan Lysacek: 167.37  – 257.67
Winner Gold Medal – from the United States

Evan Lysacek wins the Men’s freestyle skate tonight in Vancouver. It was a long night of competition. He did not pull a quad, but had a perfect skate technically. The scores are as follows:


Evgeni Plushenko: 165.91 – 256.36
Winner Silver Medal from Russia

He came in big from the men’s short program, poised for the win, but after all the chatter about the quad and the rivalry, it seems that nerves got the best of Evgeni tonight, he skated well, popped a quad but in the end he could not pull out the win.


Daisuke Takahashi: 156.98 – 247.23
Winner Bronze Medal from Japan


Stefane Lambiel 162.09 – 246.72
4th Place from Switzerland

Patrick Chan of Canada: 160.30 – 241.42
5th Place from Canada

Young Patrck Chan had a good skate, but he faltered. At 19 his skating career is far from over. The judges were very generous with scoring tonight affording every point to Chan that he needed. But in the end, he stood in 5th position.

and
Johnny Weir:  156.77 – 238.87
6th Place from the United States

Johnny Weir wasn’t going down without a fight, there was no quad, but there was spunk. After all the drama about costumes and fur, Johnny came and did what he could do, but it wasn’t enough to challenge the pack. Maybe next time Johnny.

Honorable mention goes to Nobunari Oda – ( 238.54 ) who skated a wonderful program to Charlie Chaplin, only to have a skate lace pop out with a minute to go in his program, and he was penalized 3 points for a wardrobe malfunction. And he got back out there and finished his skate. Had his skate not popped he would have contended for a medal.

From CTV Olympics: The Final Call:

Patrick Chan‘s free skate lifted him two places from Tuesday’s disappointing seventh-place finish in the short program, but it wasn’t enough for a podium finish.

Chan finished fifth in the men’s figure skating competition. The 19-year-old skater from Toronto finished more than 16 points behind the new Olympic champion Evan Lysacek of the United States.

Lysacek dethroned 2006 Olympic gold medallist Evgeni Plushenko, edging the Russian by just over a single point after he performed a clean skate to Sheherazade by Nikolai Rimski-Korsakov. The 24-year-old American’s winning combined score was 257.67 points.

Skating last in the competition after winning Tuesday’s short program, Plushenko skated a clean program but scored 1.86 points less than Lysacek for his technical elements.

It was less than two points, but it was enough.

Plushenko took silver with a combined score of 256.36.

Japan’s Daisuke Takahashi fell on his opening quadruple toeloop to earn bronze with 247.23.

Chan, seventh after Tuesday’s short program, stepped out of an early triple Lutz and fell outright on a triple Axel late in his program, Thursday.

It was his footwork that picked him up off the ice.

The reiging world silver medallist’s level-4 step sequence was performed flawlessly, and Chan picked up a whopping 82.00 points in the category that takes skating skills, transitions and link footwork, performance and execution, choreography and musical interpretation all into account.

Chan is famous for his difficult and intricate footwork, and he used it to finish fifth behind four points behind Swiss skater Stephane Lambiel with a score of 241.42.

Johnny Weir of the United States finished sixth with a score of 238.54 while Japan’s Nobunari Oda – fourth after the short program on Tuesday – received a three-point deduction after snapped skate lace halted his skate. Oda was awarded three minutes to fix the problem, then resumed his program where he had left off.

But the deduction proved costly, and Oda’s combined short program and free skate score of 238.54 dropped him to seventh.


Figure skating hopeful Chan “really lost” after faltering in short program

Lori Ewing, The Canadian Press – online report here

VANCOUVER – The huge grin that seems a permanent fixture on Patrick Chan‘s face was nowhere to be seen, replaced instead by a look of bewilderment when his short program came to an end.

Russian star Evgeni Plushenko made his return to the Olympic arena in stunning fashion by finishing first in the men’s short program Tuesday, while Chan, the young Canadian with medal potential, faltered in a jam-packed men’s field at the Pacific Coliseum.

It was the poise that comes with a veteran’s experience, and not the high-flying quad, that proved the difference on this night for Plushenko, and now the 19-year-old Chan finds himself having to battle back from seventh place when he steps onto the ice for the long program Thursday.

“I’m really lost, I seriously got off the ice and I couldn’t believe what I had just done,” Chan said. “I pictured it in my mind just right, every step of the way… it’s OK, Thursday will be a new day.”

Skating to “Tango de los Exilodos”, Chan was unable to deliver the flawless routine he needed to keep pace with Plushenko and finished with a disappointing score of 81.12. He didn’t fall, but bobbled on his opening triple Axel, had an uncharacteristic stumble during his step sequence, where he normally garners huge marks, and received a one-point deduction for a going too long on his music.

Now the Toronto native, who arrived in Vancouver under huge pressure to deliver Canada’s first Olympic gold in men’s figure skating, will have to be flawless in the free skate and will need some of his competitors to falter to have a chance at the podium. He plans to channel his inner Apolo Anton Ohno, the U.S. short-track speedskater and six-time Olympic medallist whose trademark is to hang back and attack at the finish.

“It’s great to be an underdog, and kind of being out of people’s way, and just sitting back and watching,” Chan said. “It’s like Apolo Ohno, when he’s on the short-track, sitting back in last place until the last minute and then just comes in, that’s the technique I’m going to be picturing, just sitting back and enjoying it, and then attack.”

Plushenko, gold medallist at the 2006 Olympics and runner-up in 2002, opened with a quad toe-loop, triple toe-loop combination, scoring 90.85 for his “Concierto de Aranjuez” program, less than a year after coming out of a three-year retirement for one last shot at Olympic glory. A victory by the 27-year-old Plushenko, a six-time European champion, would make him the first men’s skater to repeat as Olympic champion in 58 years.

“I’ve made history already because I am back, and I didn’t skate three-and-a-half years… and not bad skate here today,” Plushenko said. “It gets more difficult with each Olympic Games, with each competition it gets more complex, with each season. It’s not because I’m getting older, more mature, it’s because you have to prove yourself again. Again, you have to prove yourself with your skating that you can do it.”

Evan Lysacek of the United States, the reigning world champion, was second with a score of 90.30. Skating a flawless routine to Igor Stravinski’s “Firebird”, an emotional Lysacek was punching his fists in the air on his final spin, then covered his face after his skate as the crowd gave him an ovation.

Daisuke Takahashi of Japan was third, earning 90.25 points with his expressive performance to “Eye” by Coba. Neither Lysacek or Takahashi attempted a quad.

Vaughn Chipeur of Edmonton scored 57.22 with a shaky performance, stepping out of a triple toe-loop, and stumbling on his serpentine step sequence. He earned the last qualifying spot for the free skate, finishing 24th.

Chipeur said he had trouble keeping his nerves in check.

“You can’t simulate that at home, you can’t simulate the crowd and competition environment,” he said. “I just think that the adrenalin and the nerves, you’re in the moment, but it’s so hard to analyze what you’re doing when you’re doing it, so you fight for what you do, and sometimes it doesn’t quite go as planned.”

Tuesday’s disappointing skate was simply the latest glitch on a tumultuous season for Chan, who had a bad bout of the flu in September, tore his calf a couple of weeks later, which kept him off the ice for several weeks and out of all but two competitions this season. Then, just a month from the Olympics, his coach Don Laws announced he was dumping the 19-year-old skater.

He admitted he had some trouble focusing in the short program.

“A little bit, skating into the triple Axel a little bit overwhelmed,” he said. “It’s like going into focus and out of focus, you’re on that fine line, that’s just a matter of me learning.

“I’m still pretty young, Tiger Woods is a good example, when he goes out and plays, I’m pretty sure he’s in that focused zone like this,” he added, snapping his fingers. “That’s one thing I have to learn is getting into that zone and staying in that zone.”

Johnny Weir finished sixth with 82.10 points, but what the crowd-pleasing American lacked in points, he made up for in style. Wearing a flamboyant black translucent corset-like suit adorned with pink lacing, Weir skated a confident routine that engaged the crowd. After his skate, he blew a kiss and took a couple of bows before picking up a black, heart-shaped pillow with his name embroidered in pink.

“My goal for this whole competition has been to show people my heart and take them on a journey with me and make them feel like they’re with me, they can feel me skating,” Weir said.

Weir arrived in Vancouver amidst a fur flap, drawing the ire of animal rights group PETA for wearing a small patch of fox fur on his costume at the U.S. championships. Weir feared for his safety after receiving death threats, and so opted to stay in the athletes village rather than outside the village as he’s originally planned.

Former world champion Brian Joubert of France was one of the nights biggest disappointments, stepping out of his quad to-loop and falling on his triple Lutz, putting himself in an impossible position to keep up with the leaders. He was 18th after a score of 68.00.

In a field in which eight men could realistically win the title, the quad jump has polarized the field, with big jumpers such as Plushenko — known as the “Quad King” — on one side, and more well-rounded artistic skaters such as Chan on the other.

Plushenko’s coach Alexei Mishin criticized the skaters without the quad.

“Some skaters and coaches are explaining this is a new era, we don’t need quad, we need clean skating with triple jumps,” Mishin said. “I think that they are wrong, because skating without quad is a time before (Canadian Elvis) Stojko, before (Alexei) Urmanov, … Those who are not able to jump, don’t make fake explanation, because this is a shame to skate without quad, when Stojko skated 10 years before and did it.”

Plushenko has admitted he doesn’t do the transitional elementsbetween and before jumps that are crucial under the new judging system, and which Chan does so well — Plushenko said he’d rather focus on his jumps.

“I don’t care today about the transitions or the scoring system,” Plushenko said Tuesday. “All I care about is that I did today my clean program. That’s really important for me because it’s my third Olympic Games, and I skated not bad. I’m going to take any result in this Olympic Games, any result, even fourth, third, second. Of course I’m going to try my best.”

Skate Canada officials, meanwhile, had their sight set on three medals in Vancouver, with ice dancers Tessa Virtue and Scott Moir arguably the country’s top hope for a podium performance. Reigning world silver medallist Joannie Rochette will battle for a medal in women’s singles.